More nonsense in a minute

Dave Aldridge has released an interesting blog post I want to respond to or at least use as a springboard for a personal rant. Where Dave asks “What, then, will become of the proposed LEA chains?” I guess he is dealing with that uncomfortable truth that the big businesses behind academies will – or may – not want to take on smaller schools, rural areas, some of the seemingly insoluble issues that lead to “poor quality pupils.” [NB: the website of the original report seems to have been taken down] That the state provides the “safety net” (I’m not sure of this shorthand metaphor) seems eminently reasonable; if the government has decided not to be the major player in what was a national initiative, well, we, the electorate, voted them in, sort of. Today it seems “we, the people” voted for a string of idiocies…

…Continue reading on Nick Swarbrick’s blog here:

http://nicktomjoe.brookesblogs.net/2016/04/27/more-nonsense-in-a-minute/

 

 

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How ought war to be remembered in schools?

Anzac Day 2016.  Reposted from Dave Aldridge’s blog here: https://zudensachen.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/how-ought-war-to-be-remembered-in-schools/

In November I published this short book in the Philosophy of Education Society’s ‘Impact’ Series (Impact21)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/2048-416X.2014.12001.x/abstract

You can watch a video of the launch event here:

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid982198451001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAAkPubcZk~,_5wRjVEP-2Sma1whESEDFKmqjWi9oghp&bctid=3935715922001

It was picked up by The Guardian here:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/nov/11/call-rethink-remembrance-day-schools

I also wrote an accompanying piece for The Conversation:
https://theconversation.com/how-should-we-teach-remembrance-at-school-33818

…as well as an invited piece for Wiley’s War Studies blog here:
http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-824063.html

Philosophy for Children boosts children’s progress in literacy and maths

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We in Athens are particularly pleased at the recent connections made between ‘philosophy for children’ and children’s success in literacy and maths. Today we spoke directly to the originator of P4C’s method of questioning, Socrates himself:

“Yes, well I’m pleased because I’ve always thought that my method of questioning could be of use to state policy makers and educators of the young, but I’ve never been able to demonstrate this convincingly. I’ve always been inclined to communicate the value in terms of useless things like discerning the good and working out how best to live one’s life. One education endowment fund project was able to demonstrate that my interventions boosted the development of wisdom by as much as two months, but I don’t think this was publicised very well.

I’m very proud that gains can be demonstrated in mathematics and writing as a result of doing philosophy. This is despite…

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Agree to Disagree? Let’s not

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Recently a colleague offered in conversation that we should agree to disagree.  This led me to some observations about the role of agreement and disagreement in dialogue.  Some conversations involve a sort of perpetual agreement or mutual affirmation.  These are instances where we’re really just ‘shooting the breeze’, and there’s nothing much at issue between us.  We exchange the gnomes of accepted wisdom and nod.  Other exchanges are characterised pretty much by disagreement.  These are the situations where we talk at cross purposes, or talk past each other – we can’t even seem to get started on the way in which the matter at hand needs to be interrogated. 

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Hermeneutics and Education

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Bloomsbury have kindly allowed me to share a sample chapter of my newly released book via my institutional repository.  I include a summary of the chapter’s content below, and you can download the chapter and get full citation details here.

This chapter considers the implications of philosophical hermeneutics for the well-known ‘pedagogical triangle’ of teacher, student and subject matter. We find our way to what is specifically educational in the hermeneutic dialogue by considering examples of deficient or degenerate conversation. The close relationship between the ‘instructional’ (or pedagogical) triangle and the hermeneutic situation can then be emphasized, particularly once we acknowledge Heidegger’s requirement that the teacher must learn to ‘let learn’. All hermeneutic situations, it will be shown, are educational. How, then, moving beyond this global understanding, can hermeneutics inform those local situations that we wish to think of as specifically educational (i.e. schooling)? This leads us to consider…

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